Artquest is not an independent organisation, so we have no board like a charity or other enterprise might have.  We are a National Portfolio Organisation of Arts Council England, and operate as a programme of University of the Arts London.

Artquest has a team of eleven advisors, meeting three times a year, to talk about our programmes with us and help extend our reach in the art world and beyond.

Our current advisors are:

Stephen Beddoe

Stephen is Director of External Relations at Central Saint Martins, part of University of the Arts London. He was Director of Careers and Employability at University of the Arts London, Europe’s largest specialist institution for art, design and communications, until 2015, and the founding Programme Manager of Artquest. Stephen originally studied fine art at The Glasgow School of Art, and has exhibited work nationally and internationally and has curated projects in numerous galleries and public spaces in the UK and beyond. From 1995 to 1997 he was Visual Arts and Crafts Officer for London Arts Board (now Arts Council England London office) and from 1997 to 2001 was Commissions Manager for Public Art Commissions Agency and (subsequently) Modus Operandi Art Consultants, commissioning major public art projects internationally. Stephen joined University of the Arts London in 2001 to develop and launch Artquest. From 2005-2009 Stephen was also a Specialist Advisor (Visual Arts) to the Scottish Arts Council and is currently a Trustee of London Print Studio. Stephen is also a Harkness Fellow (the UK’s reciprocal Rhodes Scholarship) and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA).

Helen Carnac

Helen was awarded a Cultural Leadership fellowship in the crafts in 2009 in order to develop ideas about how the crafts are communicated.  In 2006 she was co-chair for the Association for Contemporary Jewellery’s conference Carry the Can and is actively involved in developing dialogue within the crafts having developed numerous talks and events for makers over the past six years.  She curated the inaugural Craft Rally, held in London in 2010, and the national touring exhibition Taking Time: Craft and the Slow Revolution (2009-2011).  Her work is held in both national and international collections.

Teresa Cisneros

Teresa Cisneros is a Chicana (Mexican-American) cultural producer. She has worked as a curator, art educator and arts manager, including at Iniva (Institute of International Visual Arts), Tate Modern, 198 Contemporary Arts & Learning, Nottingham Contemporary and at the Wellcome Collection. With artist Barby Asante, Cisneros initiated sorryyoufeeluncomfortable a collective united by a rejection of the idea that we are living in a post-racial, post-patriarchal, post-heteronormative and post-colonial society, and a desire to challenge and critique these dominant structures. She also co-founded the independent curatorial collective agency for agency in 2015 and is currently curatorial fellow at The Showroom, a post supported by Arts Council England’s Change Makers fund. Cisneros’ projects and work explore the politics of identity, history and contemporary art practices.

Mark Dunhill

Mark Dunhill completed a BA (Hons) in Fine Art at Bristol Polytechnic and graduated with an MA in Sculpture from the Royal College of Art, London in 1977. Working with Tamiko O’Brien as Dunhill and O’Brien, he has been working collaboratively since 1998 in exhibitions in galleries and project spaces in the UK, Ireland, Holland, Italy, Germany and Japan and have participated in residencies including the British School at Rome and the European Ceramic Work Centre’s-Hertogenbosch, Holland.  Dunhill and O’Brien also edit and direct the collabarts research portal that investigates the nature of, and issues related to, collaborative art practice through essays, links, interviews and a timeline. He is Dean of Programmes at Central St Martins, UAL.

Greg Hilty

Greg’s career has been focused in London: from the Riverside Studios in west London he moved to the Hayward as senior curator through the 1990’s.  He gained the position of Director of Arts for London Arts and Director of Visual Arts and Literature for the Arts Council England’s London office (1999–2004).  In 2005 he founded Plus Equals with the University of the Arts London, developing artistic initiatives across different disciplines and industries.  Greg has been Curatorial Director at Lisson Gallery since 2008.

 

Rona Lee

Rona is Professor of Fine Art at University of Northumbria at Newcastle, and an artist working across critically engaged fine art practices. Working in an eclectic and ‘expanded’ manner, combining different media – performance, photography, sculpture and video – with techniques and technologies ‘borrowed’ from a range of other disciplines, Rona operates across gallery and non-gallery settings. Rooted in feminist, performative and conceptual practices, questions of subjectivity and alteriety form continuing concerns with Rona’s work. Born by the sea, a number projects have adopted water as an investigative locus, paralleling a wider set of interests in the fluid / volatile as a philosophical, cultural and material category. She is interested in the ways in which art making might engender dialogue with and amongst different audiences and communities of interest, both specialist and amateur, prompting reflection on existing ways of thinking and doing, while pointing towards new models of relating.

Gilane Tawadros

Gilane is the Chief Executive of DACS. Established by artists for artists, DACS is a not-for-profit visual artists rights management organisation which has generated over £67m in revenues for 20,000 artists over the past 30 years. Gilane was the founding director of the Institute of International Visual Arts (InIVA) in London, chaired by Professor Stuart Hall, which, over a decade, achieved an international reputation as a ground-breaking cultural agency at the leading edge of artistic and cultural debates nationally and internationally. Curatorial projects include: Veil (New Art Gallery, Walsall; Bluecoat Art Gallery & Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool; Modern Art, Oxford, 2003; and Kulturehuset, Stockholm, 2004), Fault Lines: Contemporary African Art and Shifting Landscapes, 50th Venice Biennale (2003) The Real Me (Institute of Contemporary Art, London (2005), Brighton Photo Biennial (2006), Alien Nation (ICA and tour, 2006–7), Transmission Interrupted (Modern Art, Oxford, 2009). Books include Changing States: Contemporary Art and Ideas in an Era of Globalisation (Iniva, 2004) and Life is More Important Than Art (Ostrich, 2007). She was a board director and then president of the International Foundation of Manifesta (Amsterdam) and serves on the boards of Camden Arts Centre (London), London Film and Video Umbrella, Matts Gallery and the editorial board of Whitechapel Art Gallery.

Cecilia Wee

Cecilia is an artist writer, broadcaster and curator who produces art projects that challenge existing models of audience engagement, particularly in the fields of experimental sound, performance and visual art practices, in the UK and internationally.  She is a regular arts documentary programme maker for Resonance FM, co-founder of interdisciplinary art project Rational Rec, and a Visiting Lecturer in Visual Communication, Royal College of Art.  Her research interests include narratives of technological ‘progress’, the theory and practice of dialogue, cultural understandings of militarised combat, civil society in the Global South and post-Kantian aesthetics.  Cecilia is Chair of the Board of the Live Art Development Agency, on the regional council of the Arts Council England London office and is a Council Member of Resonance FM.

Shelagh Wright

Shelagh is engaged with a diverse range of people and projects around the world on cultural and creative economy policy and sustainable practice.  She has worked extensively with government and the public, charitable and private sectors on creativity, social enterprise, investment and innovation agendas and is an associate of the think tank Demos.  Her publications include ‘After the Crunch – the creative economy in recession’; ‘So What Do You Do? A new question for policy in the Creative Age’; ‘Making Good Work’; ‘Design for Learning’ and ‘Creativity, Money, Love’, in addition to articles and papers on creative enterprise, creative clusters, skills and investment policy.  Shelagh has led programmes of work with the British Council, Creative and Cultural Skills, Screen England, Arts Council England, Creative Partnerships, was a contributor to the Creative Britain strategy and a member of the EU Expert Working Group on the Creative Industries.  She is also a Director of ThreeJohnsandShelagh (with John Holden, John Kieffer and John Newbigin), an associate of the Culture+Conflict initiative and a director of missions models money.

Jeff Zie

A digital veteran, Jeff has over 20 years of experience in successful digital media in startup and corporate environments, holding senior strategy and management positions at Electronic Arts (EA), BSkyB, Microsoft and Emap.  He launched EA’s online casual games business, Pogo, in the UK, France and Germany, and built BSkyB’s combined interactive service division.  He also held the first Creative Directorship of MSN UK.  Jeff has been a panellist and speaker at various industry events, including BAFTA, GETIF, MIP, Milia, Museum of Television & Radio (LA), AFI and the British Consulate.  Prior to the world going digital, Jeff was a Designer and Art Director at some of the world’s leading consultancies and agencies.  He is a partner in The Virtual Team.

Former members of the Advisory Group include Amanda King, Mark Sealy MBE, Sarah Rowles and Layla Curtis.

Share