Websites

Many artists display their work on a website, as well as maintaining a number of social networks as fits their practice, skills and needs.

In addition to showcasing work to an online audience, it allows other people to easily find out more information. Websites are relatively affordable, with many DIY design packages available to help create a simple but effective online presence, as well as blogs providing a free alternative (still requiring updates).

A website can:

  • Increase your visibility, making you and your work easier to find
  • Develop your audience
  • Develop an email mailing list to get regular updates on you and your work
  • Help sell your work (depending on the nature of the practice in question)
  • Help with applying for online opportunities by allowing website links to specific images / information.
  • Help organise all the documentation of your work and provide an archive of your activity

The layout and presentation of your website should be appropriate to your practice, the time you have to update it, and best represent your work within the limitations of the internet. It may include:

  • Well-photographed images of your work, or short film clips, hosted by YouTube or Vimeo if you agree to their terms of use
  • Installation shots of exhibitions and projects
  • Artist statement
  • Artist CV
  • Contact details, or details of the gallery that represents you
  • Scans of, or links to, press articles or reviews
  • A news section, with information about upcoming exhibitions and projects, if you can update this regularly
  • An online shop or details on how people can purchase your work

This post by CreativeBoom has tips on how to build a site that people will trust.

Don’t forget to read about other ways of raising your online profile like blogs and social networks, which many artists use instead of their own website.

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